Teaching

Teaching Philosophy

First-Year Writing

ENG 1510: Writing & Rhetoric I

ENG 1510 is an introductory course in writing and rhetoric. The goal of the course is to introduce students to basic ideas important to writing, such as literacy, rhetorical purpose, audience, genre, and discourse. Students will analyze and produce both traditional written texts and multimodal texts for various audiences and for various purposes in order to develop critical literacy.

These sections of ENG 1510 are part of a special theme in the College of Arts and Sciences, "Technology & Society." Courses in this theme focus on the relationship between humans and technology. The following sections of ENG 1510 focus specifically on the technology of writing and how technology has influenced writing.

Fall 2017 6188

Syllabus Schedule Grade Breakdown Learning Management System
WP1 WP2 WP3 Reflection

Notes: This section follows the basic curriculum below, but with some minor tweaks. The course is now designed to focus on discourse earlier, assignments sheets and course documents have been updated with new designs, and multimodality is encouraged more in all writing projects.

Fall 2016 10588

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Reflection Task Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive

Notes: The major assignments and readings are based on the curriculum for ENG 1510 developed below with a few minor changes. All of the major writing projects have been updated to encourage more multimodal composing. Greater emphasis has been placed on teaching about literacy in WP1 and on the justifying rhetorical choices in WP3. Assignment sheets have also been updated for a more consistent design.

Fall 2015 9353 & 9462

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Reflection Task Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive

Notes: These courses are part of my first semester at Ohio University. The curriculum is changed substantially from ENG 101 at Arizona State University: All three writing projects are updated. In particular, WP1 is more focused on specific literacy practices, and WP3 is entirely new. Both textbooks used this semester are different as well.

ENG 194: Academic Writing in Engilsh

Like WPC 194 below, ENG 194 is a special course designed for second-language writers majoring in business. The course is designed as a "walkalong," that is to say that students are expected to take the course at the same time as a WAC 107 section of first-year composition. The purpose of the course is to give students additional writing practice specifically focused on the needs of second-language writers through genres related to business.

Spring 2015 (2 Sections)

Syllabus Schedule WT1 WT2 WT3 WT4 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive

Notes: The curriculum for this course is based on the curriculum I designed for WPC 194 below. A few changes were made to give students more time to focus on the major writing tasks. More time was scheduled for discussions of plagiarism and presentation design.

WPC 194: English Writing for Business

WPC 194 is a special course designed for second-language writers majoring in business. The course is designed as a "walkalong," that is to say that students are expected to take the course at the same time as a WAC 107 section of first-year composition. The purpose of the course is to give students additional writing practice specifically focused on the needs of second-language writers through genres related to business.

Fall 2014 (8 Sections)

Syllabus Schedule WT1 WT2 WT3 WT4 WT5 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive

Notes: This course was first offered in Fall 2014. I designed the curriculum at the request of the English and Business departments, implemented the curriculum, and assessed its effectiveness.

ENG 101: First-Year Composition

ENG 101 is the first part of a two-part first-year composition sequence at Arizona State University. This course primarily focuses on expository and analytical writing.

Summer 2014 43286

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive

Notes: This section is an adapted and updated version of the section below. The Fall 2013 section included an increased emphasis on reflection. This section expands that emphasis and includes explicit discussions of learning transfer, both backward-reaching and forward-reaching, high road transfer. In this section, the syllabus has also been significantly redesigned to be more visually appealing and student-friendly.

Fall 2013 75951

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Digication Supplemental Videos

Notes: In this section, there are a number of changes over previous sections. First of all, this section was fully online. This is the first section of first-year composition that I taught in this format. The assignments used for this section were adapted from the Summer 2012 section of ENG 101 and the Fall 2012 section of ENG 107. The assignments were updated, however, and the assignment sheets were fully rewritten. The most significant change in this class is an increased emphasis on reflection. While reflection has been a part of my first-year composition classes for a number of semesters, there is significantly more reflection in this class compared to previous ones. There is a written reflection after each major draft (first drafts, revised drafts, and final drafts) as well as an updated overall reflection at the end of the semester.

This section was also part of a Digication pilot. ASU Writing Programs decided to test using Digication as a way to archive student writing. I was part of the tentative tests in the summer semesters of 2013 and decided to use Digication to fully replace Google Drive in my curriculum in the fall. All major drafts and the final reflection were submitted through Digication and became part of the ASU Digital Archive. Students were also encouraged to create public e-portfolios to showcase their writing through Digication.

Summer 2012 46766

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive
Notes: This section of ENG 101 was set up as a special section for incoming freshman athletes. ASU Athletics set up a program similar to University Bridge when that program was discontinued. This section was taught in conjunction with two university success classes. As with University Bridge, I felt that meeting daily and allowing for extra time for extra help contributed to making this class successful.

Fall 2011 71639 & 71748

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Blackboard and Facebook

Notes: This hybrid section of ENG 101 was an experimental section focusing on online writing. While the curriculum was not entirely successful, the assignments used in this section helped to inform future first-year composition classes. In particular, the assignments used in this section of ENG 101 helped to develop the assignments focused on online ethnography used in the section of ENG 107 below.

While many students enjoyed the class as a whole and evaluations were positive overall, certain aspects of this class were not successful. For example, students found using Facebook as an LMS difficult and were concerned about privacy. Because of the problems in this sections of ENG 101, I switched to using Schoology as an LMS. Schoology has many of the features that I liked about using Facebook as an LMS (profiles, pictures, the ability to "like" comments, and so on), but it is separate and not connected to a Facebook profile. This helps to overcome some of the privacy concerns several students had with using Facebook as an LMS. It also helps to avoid some of the confusion. Credit for posts made on Facebook was given in the Blackboard gradebook. Students didn't like flipping back and forth. Schoology has an integrated gradebook that minimizes confusion about getting credit for participation.

The final writing project in this section was "Analyzing an Online Artifact." This involved finding a "chain" of remixed or repurposed media online and trying to add another link to the chain. While a few students really enjoyed the assignment and got really into it, several students struggled and didn't enjoy making their "link in the chain." Because of this, I developed a new assignment focused on discourse when I revised this curriculum for ENG 107.

Summer 2011 41689

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 WP4 Learning Management System: Blackboard
Notes: This section of ENG 101 was part of a special program called University Bridge. This program was designed to give students deemed "at risk" by the university a headstart on their first semester of college. I believe that this course was extremely beneficial for the students involved.

Fall 2010 72120

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 WP4 Learning Management System: Blackboard
Notes: This curriculum was given to new TAs as part of TA seminar. Individual teachers could modify assignments, but the assignment sequence as a whole was determined by the directors of TA seminar. While I did not continue to use the pop culture theme of the class, many of these assignments informed assignments in later ENG 101 sections.

ENG 102: First-Year Composition

ENG 102 is the second part of a two-part first-year composition sequence at Arizona State University. This course primarily focuses on argumentation.

Spring 2012 13336

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Schoology, Google Drive, and Blackboard
Notes: This was a hybrid section of ENG 102. Assignments were modified from the assignments used in Spring 2011. This course is the first time that I used Schoology as the primary LMS. There were small problems with Schoology: for example, the gradebook was hard to integrate into the class well (so I used Blackboard for its gradebook this semester). Overall, however, students liked using Schoology, and I found that it met my needs better than LMSs that I had used previously.

Spring 2011 14000 & 14005

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 WP4 Learning Management System: Blackboard
Notes: This curriculum was developed by new TAs as part of TA seminar. Individual teachers could modify assignments, but the assignment sequence as a whole was determined by the TA seminar cohort. As with the Fall 2010 section of ENG 101 above, I used assignments in this course as models when developing future assignments for ENG 102.

ENG 107: First-Year Composition

ENG 107 is the first part of a two-part first-year composition sequence at Arizona State University. This course primarily focuses on expository and analytical writing. ENG 107 is the direct equivalent of ENG 101 but is designed with non-native English speakers in mind.

Fall 2012 74249

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Grammar Contract Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive

Notes: This section of ENG 107 is special for a number of reasons. It was my first time teaching second-language writers since I left South Korea in 2010, it was the first semester that I used grammar contracts as a way of handling the grammar issue in class, and it was the first time that I used a curriculum focused primarily on online ethnography.

The grammar contracts were very successful, allowing students who wanted grammar feedback to get it and allowing those who didn't want feedback to avoid it. The focus on online ethnography had both good and bad points. I maintain that the curriculum was successful overall: students reported in an exit survey that the curriculum gave them additioanl language practice and helped them to improve their writing. However, some students were dissatisfied with the curriculum and expressed concerns in their final teacher evaluations. The primary grievence was that students didn't fully understand the purpose of the online ethnography elements of the class. This was a failure on my part to explain the motivations fully and to reflect during class time on what and how the students were learning. If I were to use this curriculum again, regular explanation of the purposes of assignments and reflection on what had been learned would be a much larger part of the course.

WAC 101: Introduction to Academic Writing

WAC 101 is a course designed to prepare students for ENG 101. The course serves as an introduction to writing in university courses.

Summer 2013 44557

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive
Notes: Like the Summer 2012 section of ENG 101, this section of WAC 101 was set up for incoming freshman athletes. The curriculum was designed to focus on reflection, making and supporting claims, and organizational strategies.

WAC 107: Introduction to Academic Writing

WAC 107 is a course designed to prepare students for ENG 101. The course serves as an introduction to writing in university courses. WAC 107 is the direct equivalent of WAC 101 but is designed with non-native English speakers in mind.

Spring 2015 24201 & 24204

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive
Notes: The curriculum for these sections of WAC 107 is adapted from the section below but with a greater emphasis on reflection and knowledge transfer.

Summer 2013 44386

Syllabus Schedule WP1 WP2 WP3 Learning Management Systems: Schoology and Google Drive
Notes: Much of the curriculum for this section of WAC 107 overlapped with the curriculum for WAC 101 above. However, because this course was designed for non-native speakers of English, certain things were different: grammar contracts were used (much like the Fall 2012 section of ENG 107 above) and more time was spent in class doing revision either with peers' help or my help.

ENG 131: Elementary Composition I

ENG 131 is the first part of a two-part first-year composition sequence at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne. This course primarily focuses on analysis, argumentation, and reflection.

Spring 2004 45

Syllabus WP1a WP1b WP1c WP2 WP3 Final Exam

Notes: For this section of ENG 131, I again made several changes. This is the first (and only) time that I gave an essay exam as part of a writing class. You may notice that the final exam is focused on two short stories. In addition to trying to inject creative writing into composition classes (with the alternatives to the memoir started last semester), I was also trying to inject literature into the composition classes. This is something I no longer do in my writing classes.

I continued to gather drafts for instructor comments and peer review separately, but I did instructor commentary before peer review in this section. This is something I have continued to do every since. I find that students are better prepared to do peer review after reading my commentary. Some students would also simply ignore peer review and wait for my comments when they did peer review first.

Fall 2003 63 & 66

Syllabus WP1 WP2 WP3 WP4a WP4b WP4c

Notes: I made several substantial changes to my ENG 131 course when I started my second year of teaching. I collected two drafts before the final: first a draft for peer review and then a draft for my comments. I also expanded the assignment sheets for my writing projects substantially, including grading criteria for the first time. I experimented with letting students choose their own grading criteria, but I was disappointed with the results. Most students chose very simple criteria: grammar, "flow," and so forth. I found over the course of the semester, I was encouraging students to choose criteria that I thought were more appropriate, which defeated the purpose of letting students choose.

This was the first semester that I tried experimented with allowing for "altnerative" versions of assignments. In my first and second semesters, I assigned a memoir assignment. This semester, I allowed for students to write poetry or a short story instead of a memoir. Few students took me up on the alternaive assignments.

Spring 2003 23

Syllabus WP1 WP2 WP3 WP4
Notes: I was still a novice writing teacher at this point, so I made very minor changes to my curriculum the second time that I taught ENG 131. I again used portfolio grading.

Fall 2002 49

Syllabus WP1 WP2 WP3 WP4

Notes: This course was the first course that I taught at a university level. Because I went into the course with little training or background knowledge about composition, I based much of the curriculum on my own experiences with composition and sample syllabi that I found online. You'll notice that the writing projects are very simple and do not include grading criteria. Grading was done on a portfolio system, which I had learned from creative writing classes I had taken. I struggled teaching this course, but I also learned a great deal about teaching and writing.

Please note that all ENG131 classes have syllabi and schedules combined into a single document.



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