Teaching

Teaching Philosophy

First-Year Writing

Upper-Level Rhetoric & Writing

Graduate Rhetoric & Writing

ENG 7980: History and Theories of Composition

ENG 7980 will provide an overview of historical perspectives on composition studies as well as current theories. Students will be asked to put theories into conversation with current trends in the field and into conversation with their own teaching and research practices. Areas of study will include process, the social turn, transfer of learning, threshold concepts, and multimodality.

Fall 2017 9151

Syllabus Schedule Grade Breakdown Learning Management System
Expansion Project Context Project Gap Project Final Project

Notes: This course was designed to introduce students to the history of the field, introduce them to current theories in the field, and contextualize how various theories and events are connected. One of the main goals of the class is to get students to mindfully consider the stances they are taking on how they teach and research.

ENG 7970: New Media Composition in English Studies

ENG 7970 is a graduate course that focuses breaking down and creating multimodal texts in digital environments and exploring how to effectively incorporate these texts into undergraduate writing courses.

Spring 2016 12980

Syllabus Schedule Narrative Audio Analysis Article Presentation Reflection Final Project
Learning Management Systems: Schoology Sample Media: Digital Literacy Narrative Tools & Sample Audio Analysis

Notes: This course is designed with two main goals in mind: to introduce graduate students to composing in digital media formats and to consider how these composing practices might enhance undergraduate writing courses. Students are able to focus a final project on either creating a multimodal scholarly text or creating a multimodal assignment for a class that they teach or hope to teach.



English as a Second Language

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